Is my child at risk for coronavirus (COVID-19)?

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If your child has trouble breathing, has blue lips, is not acting normally or looks very tired (lethargic), or anything that makes you very worried, bring them to the emergency room right away, or call 911.

The following is based on Center for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines as of May 7, 2020.

Is my child at risk for having coronavirus (COVID-19)?

Good news for children. Most children over 1 year of age seem to have mild cases of the coronavirus (COVID-19). So if your child has a fever, cough, runny nose or diarrhea it will be hard to tell if your child does or does not have coronavirus (COVID-19). The bad news is that older people seem to do worse with this virus. Even though it may be difficult, having children spend less time with grandparents may help the older people in your family stay healthier. If grandparents or adults over 65 years old are the primary caretakers of your child, try your best to keep them safe: wash hands constantly, limit your child’s contact with people outside the home, and when they do leave the home try to avoid children touching things and then touching their faces. 

Wearing facemasks is now recommended by the CDC (for those older than 2 years). They should be worn in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas with a high number of COVID cases. It is believed 1 out of every 4 patients with Coronavirus may not have any symptoms, so to prevent spread, masks can be a great help.

If you feel your child has symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath) and have been in contact with someone who you know has COVID-19 or if you live in or have recently been in an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19, seek medical care.

You can look for your local health department here for more information, including how many cases of coronavirus have occurred in your local area, and where to seek care or testing if you are at high risk for coronavirus. Most regular doctor offices are not able to test for coronavirus at this time, so it is important to check your local health department website first to find out where to go.

Should I see anyone about my child’s illness?

Children often have mild colds and coughs that you can safely treat them at home. To limit the chance that your child gets the coronavirus, we recommend you call your doctor first before going to the clinic. If you don’t have a doctor, call your local clinic, urgent care center, or emergency room before you go as they may be able to help you over the phone instead of an in-person visit.

Use the chart below to help determine your child’s risk level for having coronavirus (COVID-19). This may help you decide whether to seek out testing.

Remember, if your child has trouble breathing, has blue lips, is not acting normally or looks very tired (lethargic), or anything that makes you very worried, bring them to the emergency room right away, or call 911.

Is my child at risk for having coronavirus (COVID-19)?

Children often have mild colds and coughs so that you can safely treat them at home. To limit the chance that your child gets the coronavirus, we recommend you call your doctor first before going to the clinic. If you don’t have a doctor, call your local clinic, urgent care center, or emergency room before you go as they may be able to help you over the phone instead of an in-person visit.

If your child is enrolled in a school that offers Hazel access from home, you can sign-in now to ask Hazel doctors a question today. 

If you do not see your school listed in the sign-in link above, send us a note to let us know that you are interested in having this service available through your school in the future. Please note in the Message portion of the form that you are a parent who would like this service to be made available at your school.